Willship Experience: Shipping ‘Mayhem’

RECENTLY WE HAD AN ENQUIRY TO SHIP A SPEED BOAT TO NEW ZEALAND. WHEN WE SAW THE BOAT WE WERE BLOWN AWAY BY HOW COOL IT WAS!

This homemade, garage-built, speedboat is known as Mayhem. It has a 200hp jet ski engine and tops speeds of close to 130 km/h, yet it only weighs a couple of hundred kilos! The owner has been working on Mayhem for 2 years and has tweaked the original blueprints to modify his speed boat to how he wanted it. Absolutely incredible!

Mayhem is being shipped over to New Zealand to be used in the local riverways for about three months, but the boat may be kept there permanently. When we chatted with the owner of Mayhem he was unsure whether he planned on staying or moving back to Australia, but our helpful staff was able to provide some advice on for either circumstance.

At Willship International, we understand the requirements behind shipping vehicles internationally. So we provided the owner with two possible options with what he could do once the speedboat was over there:

WillShip NZ Storage Services Image
  • If he moved to New Zealand permanently, we can import it over there as ‘personal effects’ and he would pay no import duty or GST, or
  • If he decided to bring the boat back to Australia, after three months we clear it as a temporary import, meaning he pays a ‘bond’ to New Zealand customs, which would be equivalent to what the import GST would be on the boat. In this case, it would be 15% of landed value (value of the vehicle), freight and insurance. This is then held by New Zealand customs until re-export, where it is refunded back to him.

AT WILLSHIP, WE LOVE PROBLEM-SOLVING NEW CHALLENGES! GET IN TOUCH WITH US TODAY TO FIND OUT HOW WE CAN HELP YOU SHIP YOUR PRECIOUS CARGO GLOBALLY.

Moving Overseas: Get Ready!

SO YOU ARE MOVING OVERSEAS FOR THE LONG TERM. YOU HAVE THE FLIGHTS BOOKED, AND THE VISA SORTED. HOWEVER, THERE IS QUITE A BIT INVOLVED WHEN MOVING OVERSEAS.

WE TAKE A LOOK AT A FEW TIPS TO KEEP STRESS LEVELS DOWN!

MAKE A LIST

Make a full list of everything that needs to be done. Whether it is selling your stuff, to changing your address details to buying travel insurance. We live in the digital age, so there are heaps of great checklist apps that can sync with you and your partner. A great syncing checklist app for your smart device and computer is wanderlust. Check it out here!

GET TRAVEL INSURANCE

The saying is indeed true, “If you can’t afford travel insurance you can’t afford to travel”. Travel insurance is definitely a good idea as you can secure any financial risk, or unexpected sickness or injury in the process of the moving transition. If you are moving to pursue a job opportunity, then it is worth checking with them to see if they are covering insurance, and if they are, to what level.

GET THE PAPERWORK OUT OF THE WAY

This one is an annoying one. You will need to contact every person or company that sends you important mail and let them know you are moving – this includes banks, super-funds, insurance providers, and the tax office. From here you have two options: you can either get mail redirected to your address overseas which cost anywhere from $57 to $560, or get it redirected within Australia to either a friend or family member for $40. If you are enrolled to vote, you will need to register yourself as an overseas elector with the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC).

GET A MEDICAL CHECKUP

The best thing you can do to yourself is to get a medical checkup before leaving the country. You will find that most medical insurances won’t cover non-emergency medical appointments once overseas. So get every concern out of the way. And if you take medication ask for a letter of authorisation from your doctor. Don’t forget to see the dentist too!

SORT OUT FINANCES

This is more than exchanging your currency. It is worth visiting your accountant to explain all the technical little tax implications that affect you during a long-term stay. You will want to ask about your super, the possibility of filing an early tax return and questions regarding how the tax system may work in the country you are moving to.

STUDY CULTURE

This one is an essential. Cultural etiquette is important when moving overseas. Depending on the country you may be wanting to learn a new language, master the local greeting or gesture or understand social norms for that country. Kwintessential provide fantastic free cultural advice to most countries.

SELL, STORE OR SHIP?

If you’re planning to move overseas forever, consider whether it makes sense to sell or ship your belongings. For non-essentials you may decide to sell. But for high-value or personally valuable items, shipping can be much more accessible than you think. If you ship your car in a container, you can fill the spare space with your other valuable items. Alternatively for those only planning on going for a year or so, affordable short-term storage may be the best option.

SAY GOODBYE

This one is almost guaranteed to hurt. Saying goodbye is probably the hardest part to moving. It is also an opportunity to respect your friends and say goodbye to the people you love. Organise a ‘Going Away’ and catch up once last time. You may even end up walking away with more tips and tricks to moving than before!

SCR Drift Team + NZ Drift events

RECENTLY WE PARTNERED WITH THE SCR TEAM IN SHIPPING THEIR NISSAN TO COMPETE IN THE NEW ZEALAND NATIONAL DRIFTING CHAMPIONSHIPS!

Drifting is a form of motorsport that requires the driver to intentionally oversteer, causing a loss of traction in the rear wheels. What it looks like on track is two racecars gracefully drifting sidy-by-side, wheels spinning and smoke pouring out the back! This is what the team at SCR (Supreme Canvas Racing) do best.

Recently we had the opportunity to support the team in shipping their vehicle across to New Zealand to compete in a full season of drifting which included the D1NZ National Drifting Championship.

The SCR team started as a group of mates, and over the years have become a team that race at the highest trophy-level professional competitions. Their car is a NASCAR-inspired Nissan Silvia S13 6.2 Litre Supercharged V8 – an absolute monster!

The Silvia is piloted by Victorian Michael PROZ Prosenik, aged 26. Despite only starting his drift career in 2010, Michael has gone on to win the Victorian Drift Championship in both 2013 and 2014, and placing second this year in 2015.

The New Zealand National Drift Championship kicks on November 28th & 29th at Manfield Motorsport Park in Feilding, Manawatu. If you want to supporting the team by checking them at any upcoming events, find their calendar here! Otherwise, if you want to get the latest updates from the team, try subscribing to their Facebook page.

AT WILLSHIP WE SPECIALISE IN SHIPPING. SO WHETHER YOU’RE IN A TEAM, A CLASSIC CAR COLLECTOR, OR WANTING TO SHIP YOUR CAR OVERSEAS WE CAN HELP! CONTACT WILLSHIP TODAY FOR A QUOTE.

Feature Car: Jaguar

JAGUARS HAVE ALWAYS HAD A CERTAIN STYLE, SHAPE AND APPEARANCE. THEY HAVE EXCELLED IN SPORTS PERFORMANCE EVER SINCE THE RELEASE OF THE XK 120 IN 1948, THE JAW-DROPPING E-TYPE FROM THE 60’S, AND NOW THE BEAUTIFULLY CRAFTED F-TYPE.

READ ON AS WE TAKE A TRIP BACK IN TIME TO LOOK AT OUR FAVOURITE JAGUARS OVER THE YEARS.

Jaguar first appeared in 1922, originally under a different profile and name. Founded as the Swallow Sidecar company by William Lyons and William Walmsley, the company later dropped sidecars and focused their efforts on coach building that would eventually lead to the first Jaguar. The first Jaguar Automobile was an S.S model made in 1931. Until 1945, Lyons & Walmsley made cars that bore badge this initially, a reminder of the company’s sidecar making history. This lettering was dropped due to the resemblance of WWII Nazi troop labels. From there, Jaguar was picked as the new name.

XK120

After a number of luxurious saloon cars, Jaguar shocked the automotive community with the release of the XK 120. At the time, it was the fastest production car sporting a 3.4L engine and reaching a top speed of 200km/h. The XK120 could accelerate from 0 to 97 km/h in less than 5 seconds. Upgrades to the 120 followed onto XK 140 and XK 150. A total of 12,000 units were sold between 1948 – 1954.

MK VII

During the 50’s, The large four-door luxury MK VII was the first of a completely different lineup in comparison to past luxurious saloon cars. It was a version of the Jaguar Mark V with the XK engine and had achieved several successes in racing and rallying. However this model of car wasn’t as popular, selling a total of 30,000 units, compared to the smaller and differently styled saloon car – The MK II.

MK II

The MK II was produced between 1959 – 1969, where it respectively was renamed to the Jaguar 240 and Jaguar 340. The Mk II was a fast and capable saloon car and was very popular amongst the public, making it the second most sold car in it’s history. Jaguar sold a total of 123,000 units.

E-TYPE

When the 60’s had arrived, Jaguar had already built a successful reputation that was now reinforced with the launch of the successful Jaguar E-type. Launched at the Geneva Auto Show in March 1961, the E-type was not only a beautiful car but a record breaker. The car could reach an unheard speed of 150mph – that’s 241 km/h! The E-type was more advanced than it’s predecessors, four-wheel disc brakes, independent rear suspension and an overhead cam. After 75,000 units were made production ceased during 1975 and was replaced by it’s not so successful XJS.

F-TYPE

The F-type is a focused sports car delivering draw-dropping looks. It is the spiritual successor to the famous E-type and the replacement for the Jaguar XK. Production of the F-type was first seen in 2013 and is still producing models today. It has a supercharged 3.0L engine coming in both V6 and V8 models and proves utter performance and agility on the road.

The iconic Jaguar brand, which was sold in 1989 to Ford and again to Indian company Tata Motors in 2008, just marked its 80th anniversary of car production! Today, the brand lives on with the model XE being Jaguar’s most efficient, advanced and redefined saloon sports car that Jaguar has ever released.

How savvy shoppers are getting the best deals on classic cars!

WANT GREAT VALUE FOR YOUR CLASSIC CAR? CONSIDER EXPORTING IT TO THE UK!

Right now, we’re getting 0.46p to the dollar. That’s rubbish if you’re buying your DVD’s from the UK, but provides a unique opportunity to substantially increase your customer base if you have something to sell here in Australia.

Lately, we have seen a trend of savvy car enthusiasts making the most of this swing in the exchange rate. In many cases, it’s become increasingly attractive to look to Australian shores to purchase classic and historical cars.

A CHEAP CLASSIC

Image sourced from here.

Image sourced from here.

We recently wrote an article on the beloved marquee, MG. Looking at car sales online, right now there’s a surprising amount available on Australian websites. You can pick up a classic 1953 MG Midget in excellent condition for around $26000, with some increasing up to $43000 and beyond.

When converted that to British pounds that’s only £12000 to £18000 respectively. When you look across to the UK there’s a similar model, selling as a partial restoration only, for around for £17985! The majority of registered models are priced anywhere between £21000 to £25000.

EASY SHIPPING

photo (26)Even when you factor in shipping and insurance it’s a substantial saving. Combine that with the fact that none of these cars have been driven on icy roads covered in salt and the concept becomes even more attractive. When moving overseas the standard option is roll-on/roll-off shipping, but for a classic car it’s worth considering a secure shipping container.

TAXES AND DUTIES

worker-export-willshipIf the vehicle was manufactured prior to 1950, it can be imported duty free, and the VAT is reduced to only 5%! Even if the vehicle is manufactured after 1950 and is deemed to be of historical interest, you can still apply for what’s known as a BTI ruling, and if the UK government grant this, you will also only pay the 5% VAT on the import. This is great news for classic car enthusiasts as it greatly reduces the overall cost of your import.

As always, be sure to check import taxes and duty for changes. If the vehicle does not meet these prior requirements, or you don’t wish to apply for the BTI ruling, then currently import duty is 10% of the combined value of the car and the cost of shipping. You’ll also be liable for VAT, which is 20%, plus a £50 fee, and all of this is the responsibility of the buyer.

Feature image photo source: S. Kuelcue / Shutterstock.com

Think moving your car is expensive? It’s not.

What is Lorem Ipsum?

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry’s standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.

Why do we use it?

It is a long established fact that a reader will be distracted by the readable content of a page when looking at its layout. The point of using Lorem Ipsum is that it has a more-or-less normal distribution of letters, as opposed to using ‘Content here, content here’, making it look like readable English. Many desktop publishing packages and web page editors now use Lorem Ipsum as their default model text, and a search for ‘lorem ipsum’ will uncover many web sites still in their infancy. Various versions have evolved over the years, sometimes by accident, sometimes on purpose (injected humour and the like).